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Pagoo Notebooking Pages and Unit Study


 


Pagoo

Lesson ideas and Notebooking Pages by Wende

 


General Chapter 6 Chapter 11 Chapter 17
Chapter 1 Chapter 7 Chapter 12 Chapter 18
Chapter 2 Chapter 8 Chapter 13 Chapter 19
Chapter 3 Chapter 9 Chapter 14 Book Report Form
Chapter 4 Chapter 10 Chapter 15  
Chapter 5 Mid Book Review Chapter 16  

*Note* most Clipart courtesy of http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/
 

General:
Notebook pages that will be referred to and used throughout the unit. Print off copies as needed.

1. God designed animals to have instincts that tell them what and how to do the things necessary for survival. Pagoo’s instinct is named “Old Pal”. As you read through each chapter, record some of the things that “Old Pal” told Pagoo to do on Old Pal Notebook Page. 
2. The author uses many metaphors throughout each chapter. A metaphor is a comparison not using the words “like” or “as”. Each time you come across a metaphor, record the item and what it is being compared to on Metaphor Chart.
3. As you read through the story, you’ll learn about the metamorphosis a hermit crab goes through. Add to Hermit Crab Lifecycle Notebook Page as you come upon each stage in the story. 
4. You will be introduced to many species of tide pool flora and fauna. You can list each one on Who Inhabits Tide Pool Town? Notebook sheet, or research each one more thoroughly using individual Animal Report Forms, Fauna Fact Webs, and/or Flora Fact Webs. Pictures of animals and plants to paste on forms are included with applicable chapters. 


Chapter 1: Pagoo Might be a Hermit Crab

1.
Research and record the early stages of a hermit crabs life, when first hatched.
2. Record Old Pal’s directives (you’re hungry; try your mouth parts; food!)
3. Research food chains, from a diatom to pagurus to whale
4. Research What Makes Ocean Water Salty?
5. Record metaphors: seawater compared to soup, ocean compared to kettle of food, seaweed compared to salad. p
lankton compared to fairy ornaments, movement of plankton compared to ballet
6. Research Tide Pool Flora: Diatomes
7. Research Tide Pool Fauna: Spiny Lobster, Jelly Fish, Crabs, Baby Squid, Baby Shrimp
8. What does the word plankton mean? (Wandering) What is plankton? (Tiny animals and plants that travel together at the water surface)


Chapter 2: Shifting Tides and Changing Hides

1. Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page.
The sea is big.
Push-pull of water is tides.
You are a promise!
Eat son! Gain weight!
Keep growing.
2. What are crustaceans?
3. Research Tide Pool Fauna:
4.  Copepods. What are they? How big are they? What makes them glow?
5. What is a tide? What causes a tide? Describe ebb and flood.
6. A simile is a comparison of two things using the words “like” or “as”. Similes are used to compare small tide pools to a bowl and larger tide pools to a duck pond. Draw pictures to show this comparison.
7. How did Pagoo lose his skin? Describe the process of molting (Bent double, lashed his tail, wriggled, bucked, shed skin) on Hermit Crab Life Cycle page.


Chapter 3: Pagoo is a Hermit Crab!

1. Record molting stage and further growth of Pagoo on Hermit Crab Lifecycle Notebook Page.
2. Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page: Keep growing!, Watch it, Son!, Scoot! Find some cover!
3. Research Tide Pool Fauna:  Water Flea (if not covered in previous chapter), Crawfish (if not covered in previous chapter), Lobster (if not covered in previous chapter), Crab (if not covered in previous chapter)
4. BilLions of plankton would die, but bilLions would also live. How much is a bilLion?
5. As Pagoo went from a baby to a young boy he began to feel insecure and unimportant. Write about a time you felt insecure and unimportant.


Chapter 4: At the Ringside

1. Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page: Find another hiding place!, Dig in!, Try your claws!
2. Pagoo would always need oxygen. What is oxygen? Where does it come from? What is the chemical symbol?
3. Research Tide Pool Flora: Diatomes (if not covered in Chapter 1), Algae. What is it? How big does it get? What are the various kinds?
4. Research Tide Pool Fauna: Sea Worm, Hermit Crabs
5. Explain scale. Draw picture to show a hermit crab twelve times larger than Pagoo compared to a building that is twelve times larger than a man.
6. Record metaphors: adult hermit crabs compared to boxers, claws compared to boxing gloves, bottom of sea compared to boxing arena


Chapter 6: A Starfish , and a Few Barnacles

1. Research Tide Pool Fauna: Flatworm, Starfish, Pea Crab, Goose Barnacle, Acorn Barnacle, Sea Turtle, Whale,
2. Record metaphors:  Barnacles compared to Indian village
3.  Unlike Pagoo, barnacles traveled the oceans of the world by clinging to sea creatures and ship bottoms. On world map, locate the oceans of the world.


Chapter 7: Room and Board, Travel Included

1,  Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page:  Put ‘em up, boy! Cover yourself!
2.  Record metaphors: barnacles compared to apartment building, snail shell compared to jeweled elephant, current compared to elevator.
3.  Research Tide Pool Flora: Diatomes (if not covered in previous chapter), Algae (if not covered in previous chapter)
4.  Research Tide Pool Fauna: Barnacles (if not covered in previous chapter), Starfish (if not covered in previous chapter). Herring, Water Flea (if not covered in previous chapter), Crab (if not covered in previous chapter)

 


Chapter 8: Around Snail Cousin’s Rock

1.  Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page:  A snail shell should be your home.
2.  Record metaphors:  crab compared to bandit
3.  Research Tide Pool Flora: Eelgrass, Algae (kelp, seaweed) (if not covered in previous chapter)
4.  Research Tide Pool Fauna: Univalve Mussels (Abalone and Limpets), Shell less Snails (Sea Slugs and Sea Hare), Shelled Snails (Periwinkle, Dog-Whelks, Tube, Cowry, Cone, Turban, etc.) (Not all varieties are included)
5.  Snails are very fascinating creatures to study. I’ve included extra notebooking pages about their life cycle, shells, and mouthparts that you can use as interest dictates.
 


Chapter 9 – In, Out, Up with Traveling Towers

1. Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page:  Oxygen!
2.  Record metaphors:  Shells compared to apartment house
3.  Research Tide Pool Fauna: Sculpin, Barnacles (if not covered in previous chapter), Sea Hare (if not covered in previous chapter), Curlews, Sandpipers, Gulls, Clam
4.  Discuss camouflage. Why do some animals camouflage themselves? How did Big Head camouflage himself? What other animals use camouflage as a source of protection?
5.  In Chapter 1 you may have researched why salt water is salty. In this chapter we read of how the seawater in the tide pool became saltier. Do Salt Water Evaporation Experiment and record findings on Experiment worksheet.

Mix 2 teaspoons of salt into 2 cups of water. Pour water into a pan. Place pan in a warm, dry place. Over a period of days, allow the water to evaporate. Record observations. Conclusion: As the water evaporates out of the tide pool, the salt remains.

6.  How does a bird go about eating a clam? Explain and illustrate on included border paper.
7.  This chapter is filled with action words called Verbs. However, the author didn’t chose just any verbs, he used a plethora of Vivid Verbs to tell the tales of gulping fish, diving birds, and hiding snails. Pick out the Vivid Verbs throughout the story, and replace simple verbs with Vivid Verbs on worksheet. Some examples from story are:  lingered, spiked, skulking, sulked, charged, jerked, lashed, galloping, cruised, shuddered, lurched, tug, strain, scrambling, rattling, banging, raided, squirming, flapped, screamed, etc.
8.  Clams are interesting specimens to study. You may want to purchase some at the grocery store to examine more closely. There are extra sheets included with this chapter for further study about clams.


Chapter 10 – Houses are Scarce in Tide-Pool Town

1. Record molting stage and further growth of Pagoo on Hermit Crab Lifecycle Notebook Page.
2. Discuss habitats. A habitat is an area where an organism is supplied with food, shelter, water, and space, all the things it needs for survival. List the things that humans need and where they get them. List the things that Pagoo needs and where he gets them.
3.  Research Tide Pool Fauna:  Gull, Crab, Clam, Barnacle, Abalone, Sea Urchin, Sand Dollar, Mussel, Starfish, Sponge, Sea Worm, Scallop, Limpet
4.  Research Tide Pool Flora:  Sea Lettuce, Seaweed
5.  Vertebrates and Invertebrates – In Pagoo we read,  “only fishes hid their skeletons inside themselves”, and  “others grew skeletons outside for protection”. All animals of the world are divided into two groups. Vertebrates are animals with skeletons on the inside, called endo-skeletons.  The vertebrates we are introduced to in this story are fish and birds. Invertebrates are animals without internal bones, but sometimes have a hard protective outer skeleton called an exo-skeleton. The invertebrates we meet are broken down into further groups: Mollusks (whelks, limpets, chitons, sea hare, snails, sea slug, mussels, scallops, oysters, clams, squids, octopuses), arthropods (crabs, hermit crabs, lobsters, barnacles, shrimp, water fleas, copepods, crayfish) and echinoderms (starfish, sea urchin). Research and classify the various sea creatures.
 


Mid Book Review:

1. Review animals throughout Pagoo by completing Who Am I? Worksheet
2. Review Tide-Pool vocabulary by completing word search.


Chapter 11 – A Concrete Tile Can Craw Both Ways

1. Record metaphors: shell compared to house trailer, shell compared to castle, claws compared to weapons, hermit crab fights compared to boxing game
2. Research Tide Pool Fauna: Tube snail, Horn Shell, Hermit Crab (if not previously covered)
3.  Discuss the phrase “don’t blow your own horn” and how it is not good to be proud and boastful. Pagoo gave new meaning to “Don’t blow your own horn”. He really did blow it with his horn shell, didn’t he? Another hermit crab stole his shell as Pagoo pranced around in victory! Use Proverbs 27:1-2 for copywork exercise, and/or write about a time when someone you know acted too proudly and ended up looking foolish instead.


Chapter 12 – Hermit House from an Ancient Jungle

1.  Pagoo is molting again! Record molting stage and further growth on Hermit Crab Lifecycle Notebook Page.
2.  Record metaphors: anemones compared to ancient jungle
3.  Research Tide Pool Fauna:Limpets (if not covered in previous chapter), Chilton, Sea Cucumber, Serpent Star (Brittle Star), Sea Anemones
4.  Research Tide Pool Flora:  Kelp (if not covered in previous chapter)
5.  Pagoo is part of the “Clean-up Squad” of Tide-Pool Town. The “clean-up squad” consists of animals called Primary Consumers, the first class of animals in the food chain. They eat “detritus”, which is the mixture of decaying plant and animal remains at the bottom of the tide-pool, along with microscopic plants called “phytoplankton” and microscopic animals called “zooplankton”, and anything else that falls to the bottom. (Refer back to Chapter 1). Primary consumers found in Tide-Pool Town are hermit crabs, crabs, clams, shrimp, barnacle, sea cucumbers, brittle stars, snails, and worm. Research and record the benefits of the “Clean-up Squad”.


Chapter 13 – The Grotto of Eating Trees

1.  Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page:  You may be large, but not that large!  Pagoo hit the jackpot!
2.  Record metaphors: plankton compared to ballet, hydroids compared to eating trees
3.  Research Tide Pool Fauna: Snail (if not covered in previous chapter), Bryozoans, Hydroid, Medusa Jellyfish, Shrimp (if not covered in previous chapter), Crabs (if not covered in previous chapter), Blenny, Worms (if not covered in previous chapter)
4.  If your child is familiar with Greek Mythology, he may recognize the name Medusa. Medusa was a horrible looking Gorgon, with snakes for hair, yellow fangs, and scales around her neck. Why do you think the Hydroid sea animal was named after the Mythical being?


Chapter 14 – Among the Crabs, a Shy Masked Lady

1.  Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page:  Simmer down!
2.  Record metaphors: claws compared to door, crab compared to strong man, lady decorator's camouflage compared to garden
3.  In Chapter 2 a simile was introduced. This chapter has another fun simile: “Pagoo’s fat little shell still rocked in the undertow on the tide-pool floor, like a cradle rocking in a nursery”.  Illustrate the mental image this simile brings forth. (Notebooking page not included)
4.  Research Tide Pool Fauna: Hermit Crabs (if not covered in previous chapter), Sea Snails (if not covered in previous chapter), Rock Crabs
5.  Research Tide Pool Flora: Eelgrass (if not covered in previous chapter), Seaweed (if not covered in previous chapter),  Rockweeds (if not covered in previous chapter),  Algae (if not covered in previous chapter)
6.  Pagoo meets an interesting decorator crab, who uses special glue to attach all kinds of weeds and grasses to her body to hide herself. Using crab coloring page, glue bits of yarn, string, construction paper, etc. to back of “decorator crab”. (You may want to print this page on heavier paper)
7.  Does your grocery store sell whole crabs? Take a look at them this week, identifying the different parts. Complete Crab Anatomy and/or crab lifecycle worksheets if desired.


Chapter 15 – Pagoo Takes a Shell – Keeps, Too.

1.  Record molting stage and further growth of Pagoo on Hermit Crab Lifecycle Notebook Page.
2.  Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page:  Nope, don’t mix in.
3.  Record metaphors:  “This House Taken” sign compared to feelers, turban shell compared to barn.
4.  Research Tide Pool Fauna: Hermit Crab (if not covered in previous chapter), Sculpin (if not covered in previous chapter), Decorator Crab (if not covered in previous chapter)
5.  Use Old Pal’s rules for choosing a shell as copywork or dictation exercise.


 Chapter 16 – Death Trap!

1. Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page:  Fresh water will kill you!
2.  Research Tide Pool Fauna:  Snail, Copepods, Limpet
3.  Research Tide Pool Flora:  Algae
4.  The tide pool food chain was mentioned in Chapter 1. You can do further research identifying what kind of eater the tide pool creatures each are. Pagoo eats both meat and vegetables. This kind of animal is called an omnivore. An animal that just eats meat is a carnivore, and one that only eats plants is an herbivore. Most animals of the tide-pool are omnivores. Exceptions include:

            Zooplankton (herbivores that eat phytoplankton)n)

            Some fish (carnivores that eat worms, fish, crabs, snails, clams, etc.)

5.  Research the effect of erosion on tide pools.  We read of the ledge that juts out over the pool, the hollow underneath created by years of the water beating at and breaking away the rock. This is called erosion. The water moves over rocks, smoothing their surfaces. The receding tide pulls sand, rocks, and shells out into the ocean, leaving empty pockets. We cannot stop erosion, but can you think of any ways you can help? (Don’t disturb the plants of tide pools as there roots help prevent erosion; don’t dig in tide pools; leave rocks and shells as you find them, etc.) Complete erosion notebook page.
6.  Another simile appears in this chapter, comparing Pagoo being tossed about on the flood of rainwater to a tiny canoe on Niagara Falls. Describe this simile on prepared worksheet. 


Chapter 17 – A Fright, a Frolic, and a Farewell

1.  Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page:  Sit tight!
2.  Research water cycle – water evaporates off of oceans, condenses into clouds, and falls as rain. (Notebook page can be printed from http://www.enchantedlearning.com/geology/label/watercycle/ )
3. 
Research Tide Pool Fauna:  Crab, Lobster, Shrimp, Worms, Gulls, Clams
4.  ”When fresh water and salt waters mingled, Pagoo lost speed and sank to the bottom.” Why is it easier for Pagoo to float in salted water than to float in fresh water? Do this experiment and record your findings:  Fill a clear bowl with warm water. Place an egg in the water and see what happens. Remove the egg and mix 1 teaspoon of salt into the water. Place the egg in the water again and see what happens. Remove egg again, and mix into the water another teaspoon of salt. Place egg in salted water and observe. You will notice that the egg floats in salty water. Complete experiment sheet. 


Chapter 18 – Down to the Depths of Deep Hole

1.  Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page:  Don’t you fret the Moray Eel, Stay put!, Watch out!, Scoot!
2.  Record metaphors:  Fins compared to pitchforks
3.  Research Tide Pool Fauna:  Mussels, Barnacle, Starfish, Sculpin, Bryozoans, Moray Eel, Octopus 


Chapter 19 – Can This Be the End of Pagoo?

1.  Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page:  Don’t relax!, Get back inside!, Goodbye…
2.  Record metaphors: Octopus compared to Witch, Tentacle compared to magic wand, Suckers on tentacles compared to conveyor belt
3.  Research Tide Pool Fauna: Octopus
4.  Use the octopus as an opportunity to review multiples of eight. Complete Octopus Math worksheet.


Chapter 20 – Endless Rhythm of an Old, Old Sea

(Worksheets for this chapter included with General Pages)

1.  Complete life cycle worksheet – Pagoo mates, eggs are fertilized, and cycle starts again.
2.  Continue to add to Old Pal Notebook Page:  You’re still kicking!  Find yourself a mate.
3.  Record metaphors:  Pagoo compared to dessert


Unit Review

1.  Use leftover clipart to make a large tide-pool mural. Draw in caves, ledges, plants, etc.
2.  Complete book report form for Pagoo