Tea Time with Shakespeare

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April 23 is Talk Like Shakespeare Day!

What a fantastic opportunity to enjoy Tea Time with William Shakespeare.

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William Shakespeare, the greatest of English poets, was born at Stratford-on-Avon on April 23, 1564. He is supposed to have been educated at the free school of Stratford. At 18 years old he married Anne Hathaway. Four years later William and Anne moved to London, where they initially struggled with poverty. William got his foot in the door at local theaters, first by holding horses at the doors, then becoming an actor, and then a successful playwright and theater manager. During the years 1593-1594, the theaters were closed due to the plague, so William spent his time writing and publishing poems.

The next twenty years he spent in London as an actor, and in writing poems and plays, later becoming a shareholder as well as an actor. His works consisted of approximately 38 plays, ranging from the lightest comedy, through romance and historical narrative, to the darkest tragedy, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.

Having gained not only fame but a modest fortune, he retired in 1611 to live at ease in Stratford until his death on April 23, 1616 at the age of fifty-two.

Activities:

Read:

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Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare for Children by E. Nesbitt

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Shakespeare Stories by Leon Garfield

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Tales From Shakespeare by Charles & Mary Lamb
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William Shakespeare and the Globe by Aliki

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 Bard of Avon: The Story of William Shakespeare by Diane Stanley

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Shakespeare – His Work and His World by Michael Rosen and Robert Ingpen

Watch:

Any one of Shakespeare’s numerous plays put on film. Many full length films can be found for free on youtube.com. (Caution: some include mature themes)

Complete:

Shakespeare Plays Notebook Pages

Notebook Pages for many of Shakespeare’s major works are provided for student to complete independently. These can be used along with the original plays, the plays in story form, or the plays in movie form. Read and/or watch the plays with your child, and then let him complete report on his own.

Record what you learn about William Shakespeare on:

Shakespeare Notebook Page

Extend your Tea Time with:

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Resources from Homeschool Share’s

Renaissance and Reformation Connections page

talk like shakespeareActivities and resources from Talk Like Shakespeare web site.

For a Tea Time Treat:

Have an English tea with hot tea, cream and sugar, and scones.

 

English Tea Time

Queer English PinFor those of you who don’t school year round, welcome back to school!

As you’re getting back into a routine, your children may enjoy this fun, silly poem I found in a 1909 book, Inspiring Recitations for the School and Home. Enjoy “Queer English”, by an unknown author, for this month’s Tea Time.

Queer English

We’ll begin with a box, and the plural is boxes;
But the plural of ox should be oxen, not oxes.
Then one fowl is goose, but two are called geese,
Yet the plural of mouse should never be meese,
You may find a lone mouse, or a whole nest of mice,
But the plural of house is houses, not hice.

If the plural of man is always called men,
Why shouldn’t the plural of pan be called pen?
The cow in the plural may be cows or kine,
And the plural of vow is vows, not vine.
And if I speak of a foot and you show me your feet,
And I give you a boot, would a pair be called beet?

If one is a tooth, and a whole set are teeth,
Why shouldn’t the plural of booth be called beeth?
If the singular’s this, and the plural is these,
Should the plural of kiss be nicknamed keese?
Then one may be that and three would be those,
Yet hat in a plural would never be hose.

We speak of a brother, and also of brethren,
But though we say mother, we never say methren.
Then masculine pronouns are he, his and him;
But imagine the feminine – she, shis and shim!
So the English, I think, you all will agree,
Is the most wonderful language you ever did see.

Activities:
1. Recite and/or memorize the poem

2. Queer English Notebook Page

3. Practice handwriting skills with:

Queer English Manuscript Copywork Pages from Homeschool Share

Queer English Manuscript Copywork

Queer English Cursive Copywork Pages from Homeschool Share

Queer English Cursive Copywork

4. Analyze “Queer English” using:

Queer English Study Notes
(You can also download  Plural Rules)

5. For a tea time treat:
Have an English tea with hot tea, cream and sugar, and scones.